“Murder is my favorite crime.”

Some films are like coming home; this home sits at the end of a dark, dank alley.

We know the characters so well, they become family; this family is host to a killer.

And the script is imprinted upon our memory until the dialogue drips from our lips without thought, for indeed, they have become our own thoughts.

One of these films for me is Laura (1944). Like the eponymous heroine, this elegantly crafted Film Noir leaves an indelible impression with every viewing. As summarized on its IMDb page: “A police detective falls in love with the woman whose murder he is investigating.”

Directed by one of the “Old Hollywood” greats, Otto Preminger, Laura is a classic ‘whodunit’? A beautiful dame has been killed, a gumshoe-with-gumption starts asking questions, skeletons rattle in their proverbial closets, and then the first act ends, and nothing is what it seemed.

Remember, spoilers are tagged in blue.

Continue reading ““Murder is my favorite crime.””

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Taking a Break

An excellent post on the importance of stopping to smell the flowers and refresh the mind once in awhile, even if you’re a writer. No, ESPECIALLY if you’re a writer.

Simple Complexities

Many of you noticed that last week I didn’t publish my customary Wednesday post. There’s a couple reasons for that. The main one was that Wednesday was July 4th, Independence Day for the United States of America (where I live), and a national holiday. I decided to honor that holiday by taking the time off, not just off my day job, but off from my writing work as well. I spent the time with family and thoroughly enjoyed stepping away from the keyboard for a spell.

ilham-rahmansyah-102-unsplash Photo by Ilham Rahmansyah on Unsplash

However, I also just thought it was time for a break. That’s right, I take breaks from writing and I highly encourage you all to do so as well. I’m not saying that you have carte blanche to stop writing every time it gets hard, but I am saying that I think it’s important to stop…

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Sit Down, John: The Music and Mythos of 1776

The backstabbing, the compromises, the pleading, the tears, the struggle… the DRAMA. In a word (two words): American Politics. And with such heightened emotions playing out upon a national stage, why wouldn’t you set it to music? No, this week’s entry is not Hamilton, but that other tuneful tale about American history: 1776.

As summarized on the IMDb page: “a 1972 musical retelling [by Sherman Edwards] of the American Revolution’s political struggle in the Continental Congress to declare independence.”

Continue reading “Sit Down, John: The Music and Mythos of 1776”

Nothing to it, But to do it.

Every summer, I get the urge to write. A craving to create something that is largely for me (although family, friends, and kind strangers are also welcome to peruse – validate me).

Let’s get Dangerous Nerdy.

About a year ago, my sister and I toyed with the idea of doing a podcast on lessons-learned through the viewing of classic films; there is a wealth of knowledge and beauty to be mined from these flicks. We wanted to give parents a glimpse into what they offer, and we also wanted to take on a project that our late father once held near and dear to his heart.

The podcast fell through, but the idea (like Don Quixote charging windmills on the plains of La Mancha), refuses to quit. Ergo, starting today, I will make weekly posts on the classic* films of my yester-years and share what makes them worth your time.

* “classic” does not refer to quality, but will instead mean any movie that was made before 1990.

These posts will not be limited to “kids” movies either. I watched a lot of stuff growing up, some of it very scary and/or serious, which I no longer regret. However, in an effort to prevent well-meaning parentals from psychologically-scarring their little ones, I’ll conclude each post with a Head’s Up report on aspects of the film that can be frightening, problematic, or require off-screen chats. I’ll also be discussing numerous plot points in each post, so spoilers will be tagged in blue.

I embark on this endeavor with a review of Disney’s live-action fantasy: Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971). As summarized on its IMDb page: “an apprentice-witch, three kids and a cynical conman search for the missing component to a magic spell useful to the defense of Britain.”

Continue reading “Nothing to it, But to do it.”

You Ain’t Heard Nothing Yet (pt.1)

To quote Bing Crosby from White Christmas “Holy cow, I’m really off the ball, aren’t I?” I’m slacking and slipping and everything in between. Who knew that working for a University right before spring would be so hectic? *cough*

Anyway, here’s Wonderwall… a whole assortment of musical munchies: